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Exoskeleton

BRAIN IMPLANT ALLOWS PARALYZED PEOPLE TO CONTROL AN EXOSKELETON WITH THEIR MIND

A new device could let paralyzed people control exoskeletons with their thoughts. Developed by researchers at the University of Melbourne, the device plugs directly into the brain without doctors having to perform surgery on the skull.

Stents are used by cardiologists to prop open blood vessels, and this implant is designed around one; it slides through an incision made in the jugular vein up to a blood vessel near the motor cortex in the brain. At the end of the stent, a metallic mesh with electrodes picks up brain activity and relays this information to a recording device in the wearer’s chest, which wirelessly transmits it to an external computer that will control the exoskeleton. The researchers have called their device a “stentrode.”
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Water splitting

University of Houston physicists have discovered a catalyst that can split water into hydrogen and oxygen, composed of easily available, low-cost materials and operating far more efficiently than previous catalysts.

That would solve one of the primary hurdles remaining in using water to produce hydrogen, one of the most promising sources of clean energy.

"Hydrogen is the cleanest primary energy source we have on earth,” said Paul C. W. Chu, TLL Temple Chair of Science and founding director and chief scientist of the Texas Center for Superconductivity at UH. “Water could be the most abundant source of hydrogen if one could separate the hydrogen from its strong bond with oxygen in the water by using a catalyst.”

Chu and colleagues including physicists Zhifeng Ren and Shuo Chen, both of whom also are principal investigators with the Texas Center for Superconductivity at UH, report their discovery – an efficient catalyst produced without the expensive precious metals most commonly used – this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
     — Jeannie Kever, UH Researchers Report New, More Efficient Catalyst for Water Splitting
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“NICEST Car Horn Ever- DIY”

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hiatus

Due to unforseen circumstances, I'm taking a break from blogging until June 5, 2017.
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Playtime

“At this amusement park, drive the heavy machinery you loved as a kid”

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Style the link

You can drop style codes into the link definition.

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Blockquote fix

I experimented.

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Search boxes

This works after a fashion, but there is no doubt it is a hack.

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Calendar strip

It's diffictult to combine multiple calendars reliably.

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Google Voice app

The last few revisions have been slowing down the app.

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Cleaner quote boxes

I went through and cleaned some things up

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Whoops!

I was looking for ways to make the entry titles on Pagan Vigil "pop!"

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Fonts on my blogs

They aren't the perfect ones

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Fruity

If I'm eating alone in the morning, I usually do cereal.

I use fresh berries if they are available and frozen ones if they are not. The secret is to put the berries in first, just enough to cover the bottom of the bowl.

I zap the frozen ones in the microwave for about a minute.

Then put in the cereal.
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Calendar versus alarm

There are no notes in the alarm.

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Slowly

David Kronstein fell in love with the capture of high-speed video while a teenager watching Mythbusters. He wanted one of those expensive cameras so bad and thought he had a shot at one in 2006 when an Olympus i-Speed 2 started at a bid of $150 on eBay.

When the bidding surpassed his college budget, Kronstein said, “Screw it, I’ll build one.”

Ten years later, he not only built the camera, he is making it available to average consumers at a tenth of the usual price. (High-speed cameras used in laboratories and TV production studios average around $25,000.)
     — David Pieirni, Affordable slow-mo camera lets you stop a speeding bullet
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Another reason to be careful of the Internet of Things

The best defense would be for everything online to run only secure software, so botnets couldn’t be created in the first place. This isn’t going to happen anytime soon. Internet of things devices are not designed with security in mind and often have no way of being patched. The things that have become part of Mirai botnets, for example, will be vulnerable until their owners throw them away. Botnets will get larger and more powerful simply because the number of vulnerable devices will go up by orders of magnitude over the next few years.
     — Bruce Schneier, Botnets of Things
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The caregiver and the iPhone

Besides the battery, the most important upgrade was the Touch ID.

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Star Trek phone accessories

Other than the Star Trek look, I'm not sure what these do better than my Motorola H720.

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Two more projects

I always start a project by designing a logo.

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Printed skull

3D-printed skull implant gives 7-year-old his life back

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Ads moving content

Annoying your potiential customer is not going to get you more money.

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“Rotary Cell Phone Prototype”

There's no practical use for this.

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Not the usual customer

That's been hard for me to accept.

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Cable gripe resolved

It's been several months and my new cable company is much more reliable than the previous one

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“No matter what, Apple loses.”

”How Apple could have avoided much of the controversy”

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